Arginine and Herpes

If you have herpes, should you avoid arginine?
Related: 8 strains of herpes virus that affect humans
New Ebook on controlling herpes holistically

Go to War with the Virus
#herpes #arginine #arginex #feverblister #shingles #healthy #nitric oxide

>

Healthy Choices Privacy Policy
Healthy Choices Disclaimer

Except for any noted source material, content copyright, Neva. J. Howell, all rights reserved

As a wellness counselor, I’ve read a lot of research on the herpes simplex virus and it’s various forms….fever blisters, genital herpes, shingles, ocular herpes, brain herpes, etc.

I’m also well-versed on the alternative medicine herpes treatments that are available, such as lysine, melissa, tea tree oil and other anti-viral essential oil blends, etc. I personally believe essential oil blends may be the most potent natural weapon we have against the herpes virus. However, the FDA has announced, proclaimed, decreed that they cannot be represented as a treatment though, as far as I know, they can be referenced for pain relief and as healing agents topically.

I am less well-versed but familiar with the only medications approved for treatment of herpes: valtrex, acyclovir and famvir.

One of the main things that is echoed on almost every website geared toward helping those with herpes is that high-arginine foods should be avoided. This is because the amino acid arginine can trigger a herpes outbreak. However, the heart needs arginine so there has to be a better way to maintain a breakfree existence than totally eliminating this important amino acid.

My concern about this ban on arginine has to do with my knowledge of the research being done on this particular amino acid and it’s importance to a healthy cardiovascular system. Is it a coincidence that one in four sexually active people have herpes AND that cardiovascular disease is a number one killer?

Oh, lord, there will have to be exhaustive studies on that one before I could say a word about it but what if….what if?

I’m in my third day on the CardioCocktail product I wrote about on the blog a few days ago. I’m not ready to give it my thumbs up yet but I can say I’m noticing more energy. And one kind of bizarre confirmation that it might be working to increase blood flow, oxygen, etc. happened at the Cracker Barrel restaurant yesterday.

As I’m sure most who eat a Cracker Barrel may have also done, I normally grab those little triangular games with the pegs and try to see if I’m dumb, pretty smart or a genius. If you’re not familiar with the games (there’s a study on wealth manifestation…would love to interview the man who created those and then got Cracker Barrels all over to buy them), they are little triangular pieces of wood with holes in them. There are pegs in every hole except one and the object is jump pegs until there is only one peg left.

In the past, and I’m talking 20 years of eating there, I have only done this one time and that was with specific help from a waitress there who knew how to do it. That one success was probably at least 5 or 6 years ago.

Well, yesterday, I sat down and did it, first try. I was looking around for somebody to tell. I tried again and failed, and then tried again, and succeeded a second time. Now this….is amazing to me.

Is my brain getting more oxygen now? Or is this just one of those strange, inexplicable little events that have nothing to do with anything else.

Anyway, I ramble. Back to the arginine studies. When a Nobel Prize is awarded for research, I tend to notice it. In 1998, the Nobel Prize in medicine was awarded to Dr. Lou Ignarro for his research on Nitric Oxide in the body.

What does this have to do with arginine? L-Arginine, taken in large doses and with near-full absorption, helps our body produce Nitric Oxide, which in turn helps get more blood flow and oxygen through your system.

When I had the Digital test done, the technician commented that a lot people die of heart attacks in their sleep because they are not producing any nitric oxide. You have to be moving to produce it, as in exercise….or you can take arginine.

But what about all those people (one in four) estimated to have herpes? Can they take such large doses of arginine or is it dangerous? On the bottle, there is a warning for those who have ocular herpes (herpes of the eye) or brain herpes but not of the other forms.


My Theory About Herpes

I have had a theory about the herpes virus for a long time now and am waiting for research to confirm it. I believe keeping it latent may be a mistake. I think it could be that the herpes virus has to be weakened by repeated attack, just the same way that it weakens a person’s system from within by repeated attack. But how do you attack something that is hiding in your system? Flush it out and then kill it. What kills herpes? Tea tree oil will kill it on the surface. See, there’s the issue. Would you have an outbreak to stop outbreaks? That’s the thing anyone with herpes doesn’t want to think about. But what if it’s the only way?

Anyway, I am saying all this to say that this research on arginine has been enough to make me rethink how I counsel people with herpes. We may be preventing outbreaks by avoiding arginine but what are we doing to the rest of the body? There may be a better way.

I hope the company that created CardioCocktail will research this vital issue. To me, they are onto something with this formula and it would be a true shame if the huge numbers of people with herpes couldn’t benefit from it.

Maybe the folks at Formor can look at adding melissa (lemon balm) to the formula and then doing some controlled tests with people who have herpes. Lemon balm is a wonderful tonic herb anyway and can be taken longterm with no ill effects. It’s a good tea to drink all the time, for general toning and health on it’s own. Might it be added to the formula for those who have herpes and might that help their body kill the virus as soon as the arginine flushes it out of it’s hiding place? And, over time, might that not weaken the virus to the point that it dies? And might there be a cure for herpes after all?

Personal feedback: After 3 days on the CardioCocktail, I developed a small fever blister on the bottom of my lip. This is the first fever blister I’ve had in years. I applied tea tree oil immediately and the next day, the fever blister is almost gone.

Interesting update: Fever blister may have taken a little bit longer than normal to completely go away but it did not resurface even though I still took the same dose of CardioCocktail for several days after that, before reducing it.

3 thoughts on “Arginine and Herpes

  1. I’ve had herpes outbreaks periodically. Lysine didn’t help, but improving my health over all has (long story).
    But when I wanted to try l-arginine supplements, I was worried it would resurface. I thought “now we’ll test that old chestnut” and took 5g l-arginine daily while the bottle lasted.
    Nothing – nada. Bubkas.
    And if my 5g couldn’t stimulate it, how is a handful of nuts going to do it?
    Here’s the thing – just because depletion of l-arginine inhibits HHV, it does not follow that extra l-arginine stimulates it. In fact, greater immune activity due to greater NO production may well suppress it by another route.
    As for the l-arginine – why spend money on Viagra, the effect of l-arginine was as effective, longer lasting, and more easily controlled.

  2. George:

    Thanks so much for posting your experience with Arginine.

    In reviewing my own experience, it appears to me that it was a combination of Arginine at high doses plus stress for three days that pushed my immune system into manifesting a fever blister.

    You post an interesting point that I had not voiced. It may well be true that an error is being made in assuming that just because the absense of arginine seems to inhibit HHV, more of it will cause HHV outbreaks.

    For those who don’t know what NO production means in the comment George made, it stands for Nitric Oxide. Google it because this is an important factor in cardiovascular health. The reason many people have heart attacks in the early morning hours, in their sleep, is because they don’t have enough nitric oxide.

    My benefits on argenix, the arginine supplement I took and about which I’ve posted so much, were phenomenal as well. I found I had a very marked increase in energy and stamina, slept better and just felt better.

    Since I’m not a man, I can’t testify to the Viagra-like response so I’m glad we have at least one man who will speak to that benefit as well.

Leave a Reply